Hu Songshan

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Imam Hu Songshan

虎嵩山阿訇

Religion
Yihewani Hanafi Sunni islam

Personal

Born
1880
Tongxin County, Ningxia, China

Died
1955
China

Senior posting

Based in
Ningxia, China

Title
Ahong

Period in office
1927–1955

Religious career

Post
Imam and scholar of the Yihewani,[1][2] scripturalist,[3] theologian.[4]

Hu Songshan

Traditional Chinese
虎嵩山

Simplified Chinese
虎嵩山

Transcriptions

Standard Mandarin

Hanyu Pinyin
Hǔ Sōngshān

other Mandarin

Xiao’erjing
ﺧُﻮْ ﺻْﻮ شً

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Hu.
Hu Songshan (1880–1955), a Hui, was born in 1880, in Tongxin County, Ningxia, China. His Muslim name in Arabic was Sa’d al-Din (Arabic: سعد الدين‎‎ Sa’d ad-Dīn; simplified Chinese: 赛尔敦丁; traditional Chinese: 賽爾敦丁; pinyin: sài ěr dūn dīng). Although he was born Sufi and turned Wahhabi, he changed his views and turned his back on Wahhabism after a Hajj to Mecca and later became an important imam, scripturalist, and leader of the Yihewani Muslim sect in China. He was influential and played an important role in Chinese Islam in this position as he propagated reformist doctrines in Ningxia in his later life. Hu also played a role in rallying Muslims against the Japanese invasion of China.[5]

Contents

1 Early life and education
2 Life
3 Anti-Japanese prayer written by Hu
4 Family
5 References
6 External links

Early life and education[edit]
Hu’s father was a Gansu ahong (imam) belonging to the Khafiya menhuan, a Chinese-style Naqshbandi Sufi order. When Hu Songshan was 18, he joined Wang Naibi of Haicheng[disambiguation needed]. At age 21, he became imam of the anti-Sufi Yihewani (Ikhwan in Arabic) sect, which was founded by the Wahhabi Ma Wanfu. Hu opposed wasteful rituals and cash payments for religious services, which Sufi orders practiced. Being a member of the Yihewani, he was so against Sufism and the menhuan to the point where he destroyed his own father’s gongbei (a Hui Islamic shrine centered around a Sufi master’s grave) built at Tongxin.[6]

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Post-dynastic China

1911
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